Blade Runner | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Blade Runner.
This section contains 5,024 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William Fisher

SOURCE: Fisher, William. “Of Living Machines and Living-Machines: Blade Runner and the Terminal Genre.” New Literary History 20, no. 1 (autumn 1988): 187-98.

In the following essay, Fisher identifies an emergent genre of “multinational, commercial avant-garde” films which he labels the Terminal Genre. Fisher comments that Blade Runner represents the highest achievement of this developing genre.

The possibility of finding likeness in diversity has always been a safety valve on the critical apparatus—“when in doubt, subsume it under a rubric.” Now, on the other side of long debates on the subject in film studies, we understand “genre” to be a place where social experience (in the form of narrative conventions, audience expectations, and industrial practices) combines with the critic's act of “subsuming it under a rubric” in a mutually constitutive way. But the real use value of the idea of genre rests with its divisibility: as the cultural sphere continues...

(read more)

This section contains 5,024 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William Fisher
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by William Fisher from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook