Thelma and Louise | Critical Review by Janet Abrams

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Thelma and Louise.
This section contains 998 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Janet Abrams

SOURCE: Abrams, Janet. Review of Thelma and Louise, by Ridley Scott. Sight and Sound 1, no. 3 (July 1991): 55-6.

In the following review, Abrams comments that, despite Thelma and Louise's apparent celebration of feminine freedom, the film actually expresses an oppressive attitude toward women who “take their lives into their own hands.”

Trapped in a claustrophobic marriage to carpet salesman and giant-sized infant Darryl, Thelma Dickinson is coaxed into joining her friend Louise Sawyer, a harassed coffee-shop waitress, on a weekend spree [in Thelma and Louise]. The trunk of Louise's car overloaded with Thelma's luggage, they set off in high spirits, stopping at a bar in Arkansas on their first evening. Thelma is picked up by bar-fly Harlan; when she rejects his advances he becomes violent, and Louise arrives in the parking lot to find her missing friend being raped. After a...

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This section contains 998 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Janet Abrams
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Review by Janet Abrams from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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