Forgot your password?  

Critical Essay | Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman.
This section contains 3,728 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman - Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman

Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman

SOURCE: "Richardson's Indians," in Canadian Literature, No. 81, Summer, 1979, pp. 86-94.

In the following essay, Monkman discusses Richardson's portrayal of Native Americans and identifies similar patterns of characterization in the works of James Fenimore Cooper.

No writer of nineteenth-century Canada more fully explored the literary potential of the Indian than Major John Richardson. In novels such as Wacousta (1832) and The Canadian Brothers (1840), Richardson's interest is in the conflict between red man and white man on the Canadian-American frontier. In later formula novels such as Hardscrabble (1851) and Wau-Nan-Gee (1852), he more directly appeals to the American reading public by shifting his focus to the events preceding the founding of Chicago. Yet Richardson's interest in the Indian was not limited to an exploration of his potential in frontier fiction; Tecumseh (1828), a narrative poem paying tribute to the...

(read more)

This section contains 3,728 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman - Critical Essay by Leslie Monkman
Follow Us on Facebook