King Richard III | Critical Essay by Kristian Smidt

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of King Richard III.
This section contains 10,982 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kristian Smidt

SOURCE: “Plots and Prophecies—The Tragedy of King Richard the Third,” in Unconformities in Shakespeare's History Plays, The Macmillan Press Ltd., 1982, pp. 53-71.

In the following essay, Smidt studies the role of dreams, prophesies, and curses in Richard III, demonstrating the way in which these devices structure the play.

In dramatic method Richard III is the most non-realistic of Shakespeare's history plays, not excepting Richard II. It has even been called ‘the most stridently theatrical’ of all his plays.1 In a sense it is a metadrama in which a self-styled villain conspires with the spectators to produce a black comedy and himself plays a variety of roles in order to deceive and discomfit the other members of the cast. This actor-villain speaks a total of 166 lines (i.e. about 4.5 per cent of the play's dialogue) in soliloquy or...

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This section contains 10,982 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kristian Smidt
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Kristian Smidt from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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