King Richard III | Critical Essay by James P. Hammersmith

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of King Richard III.
This section contains 3,878 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James P. Hammersmith

SOURCE: “‘This Son of Yorke’: Textual and Literary Criticism Again,” in Shakespeare Quarterly 37, No. 3, Autumn, 1986, pp. 359-65.

In the following essay, Hammersmith examines a textual crux in Richard III: that is, whether Shakespeare wrote “sun” or “son” of York in the opening lines of the play and whether the puns that result in either case make one reading more likely than the other.

Perhaps it is time again to put in a word in favor of the exercise of literary judgment in coping with textual problems and in making editorial decisions, though G. Thomas Tanselle's lucid and persuasive essay on the need to combine literary and textual criticism appeared not so long ago that it should already have passed out of memory.1 Still, the questions with which Tanselle grappled are...

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This section contains 3,878 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James P. Hammersmith
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Critical Essay by James P. Hammersmith from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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