King Richard II | Critical Essay by Robert P. Merrix

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of King Richard II.
This section contains 4,472 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert P. Merrix

SOURCE: “The Phaëton Allusion in Richard II: The Search for Identity,” in English Literary Renaissance 17, No. 3, Autumn, 1987, pp. 277-87.

In the following essay, Merrix investigates the implications of Richard's reference to the Phaëton myth, arguing that this allusion incorporates various themes appropriate to the characterization of Richard, including the search for self, pride and its fall, and the chaotic results of “ambivalent leadership.”

When confronted by Bullingbrook at Flint Castle, Richard II cries: “Down, down I come, Like glist’ring Phaëton, / Wanting the manage of unruly jades” (3.3.178-79).1 Discussion of the allusion to Phaëton in relation to Richard runs from a mere reference by Maurice Evans2 to an elaborate analysis of its relation to art and poetics in English...

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This section contains 4,472 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert P. Merrix
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Critical Essay by Robert P. Merrix from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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