King Richard II | Critical Essay by Pamela K. Jensen

This literature criticism consists of approximately 55 pages of analysis & critique of King Richard II.
This section contains 16,435 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Pamela K. Jensen

Critical Essay by Pamela K. Jensen

SOURCE: “Beggars and Kings: Cowardice and Courage in Shakespeare's Richard II,” in Interpretation 18, No. 1, Fall, 1990, pp. 111-43.

In the following essay, Jensen studies the development of Richard and Bolingbroke throughout Richard II, arguing that Richard's political fall is paralleled by a personal rise marked by his self-redemption. At the same time, Jensen argues, Bolingbroke's political rise to the kingship is followed by an inward, moral decline.

Shakespeare's play The Tragedy of Richard II depicts the simultaneous decline and fall of one king and the meteoric rise of another.1 The exalted King Richard becomes a beggar, and Henry Bolingbroke, who is introduced in the play on his knees, a petitioner to Richard, becomes king in Richard's place. By his flagrant abuses Richard himself provokes Bolingbroke's challenge to his rule and then capitulates to Bolingbroke without...

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This section contains 16,435 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Pamela K. Jensen