Richard Hooker | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Richard Hooker.
This section contains 6,818 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert K. Faulkner

SOURCE: Faulkner, Robert K. “Knowing What is Good: Rational Deduction and Rational Will.” In Richard Hooker and the Politics of a Christian England, pp. 83-96. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981.

In the following excerpt, Faulkner compares views of Aristotle and Hooker on man's nature and the use of the will to overcome evil.

The Prominence of Reason

From desire for infinite life and bliss Hooker deduces the principal moral duties, and his deduction by reason is no less singular than his orientation by desire. That the Christian Aristotelian Hooker relies more on calculation than the philosopher Aristotle will appear peculiar. The cause we have touched. Hooker claims that reason's discourse discovers an end above nature. This claim extends radically the scope of reason's guidance and lessens its subordination to custom and necessity—and to pleasure, other things naturally desired, the virtues, and even judgment and intellect itself.

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This section contains 6,818 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert K. Faulkner
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Critical Essay by Robert K. Faulkner from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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