Richard Brinsley Sheridan | Critical Essay by Jack D. Durant

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Richard Brinsley Sheridan.
This section contains 5,745 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jack D. Durant

Critical Essay by Jack D. Durant

SOURCE: “Sheridan's Grotesques,” in The Theatre Annual, Vol. XXXVIII, 1983, pp. 13-30.

In the following essay, Durant discusses Sheridan's juxtaposition of the comic and the terrifying in his dramas.

From the beginning of his career as a writer, Richard Brinsley Sheridan demonstrated a distinct flair for the grotesque. His first published poem, “The Ridotto of Bath” (1771), pictures gaudily dressed people crowding into the new Assembly Rooms at Bath and gorging themselves in a disgustingly comic way. They disfigure themselves with chewing and swallowing; they spill food all over their clothes and trample it messily into the carpeting.1 Another poem of the same year, actually a loose translation from the Greek poetaster Aristaenetus, presents two deformed prudes, one with a hunched back and the other with a single eye, who earn the...

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This section contains 5,745 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jack D. Durant
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