Ruth Rendell | Critical Essay by T. J. Binyon

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Ruth Rendell.
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Although most of the eleven stories in Ruth Rendell's new collection [The Fallen Curtain] have a crime as their subject, its detection is not the object in any of them. Instead she sets out to create a mood—ranging from the domestic to the mildly macabre—and then suddenly, in the last few pages, whisks away the veil to reveal a situation which startles the reader as much as the characters. The method could become mechanical, but it is never so here: each story has its own individual and different jolt. The best are "A Bad Heart", which works the method in reverse, and "The Vinegar Mother", a child's-eye view of adult intrigue.

T. J. Binyon, "Criminal Proceedings," in The Times Literary Supplement (© Times Newspapers Ltd. (London) 1976; reproduced from The Times Literary Supplement by permission), No. 3896, November 12, 1976, p. 1437.∗

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This section contains 147 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by T. J. Binyon
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by T. J. Binyon from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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