Renaissance | Critical Essay by Norman A. Brittin

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Renaissance.
This section contains 2,183 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Norman A. Brittin

SOURCE: Brittin, Norman A. ‘“‘All That Once Was I!’” In Edna St. Vincent Millay, pp. 70-92. New York: Twayne, 1967.

In the following excerpt, Brittin praises Renascence as an inspired poem which eloquently conveys “a sense of the immense mystery of the universe.”

Renascence, the most salient poem in Millay's first volume, conveys with extraordinary freshness and with generally fine technique a sense of the immense mystery of the universe. Like much of her poetry, it is in the tradition of American transcendentalism. “Interim” and “The Suicide” are ambitious pieces of apprentice work that reflect the encounter of late adolescence with problems of death, duty, and world-design. Aspects of the poet's genius later to be much more fully demonstrated are revealed in other poems of the...

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This section contains 2,183 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Norman A. Brittin
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Norman A. Brittin from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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