Redburn | Critical Essay by Charles Haberstroh

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Redburn.
This section contains 5,264 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Charles Haberstroh

Critical Essay by Charles Haberstroh

SOURCE: Haberstroh, Charles. “Redburn: The Psychological Pattern.” Studies in American Fiction 2 (1974): 133-44.

In the following essay, Haberstroh maintains that Redburn was written as a haven from his precarious emotional state following the publication of Mardi.

Redburn was written in part to help Melville avoid the bankruptcy toward which he was heading in 1849. After the financially disastrous “‘fogs’ of Mardi,1 Melville needed to write novels that would have a broader popular appeal. A realistic treatment of the merchant service could (and did) re-establish Melville's credit. But Redburn is probably as much the end product of a suicidal crisis as of economic necessity; in his fourth novel, Melville took a very important step away from the destructive emotional state he was evidently in during the last stages of composing Mardi.

As Norman...

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This section contains 5,264 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Charles Haberstroh
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