Redburn | Critical Essay by Jonathan L. Hall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Redburn.
This section contains 6,622 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jonathan L. Hall

Critical Essay by Jonathan L. Hall

SOURCE: Hall, Jonathan L. “‘Every Man of Them Almost Was a Volume of Voyages’: Writing the Self in Melville's Redburn.American Transcendental Quarterly 5, no. 4 (December 1991): 259-71.

In the following essay, Hall discusses Melville's unconventional use of the maturation process and the construction of individual identity in Redburn.

Redburn (1849) is the closest Melville had ever come—or ever would come—to obeying the formal conventions of the mid-nineteenth-century novel. Yet for years criticism often centered on the difficulty of describing the relation of the young protagonist to the older narrative voice which claims a continuity with him. Melville was found guilty of “neglecting to keep his center of consciousness in Redburn's inexperience, … adding reflections that could only have occurred to someone much older” (Matthiessen 397), of a...

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This section contains 6,622 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jonathan L. Hall
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