Life in the Iron Mills, and Other Stories | Critical Essay by Sheila Hassell Hughes

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Life in the Iron Mills, and Other Stories.
This section contains 10,253 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William H. Shurr

Critical Essay by Sheila Hassell Hughes

SOURCE: “Between Bodies of Knowledge there is a Great Gulf Fixed: A Liberationist Reading of Class and Gender in ‘Life in the Iron Mills’,” in American Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 1, March, 1997, pp. 113-37.

In the following essay, Hughes maintains that “Life in the Iron Mills” should be read as a religious parable and goes on to analyze the text in the context of liberation.

Critics have recognized Rebecca Harding Davis's “Life in the Iron Mills” as “radical”—calling it “a startling new experiment in literature and a pioneering document in American literature's transition from romanticism to realism.”1 Davis's tale was first published in the April 1861 issue of the Atlantic Monthly, during a period variously identified as...

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This section contains 10,253 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William H. Shurr