Rachel Speght | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Rachel Speght.
This section contains 2,027 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Elaine V. Beilin

SOURCE: Beilin, Elaine V. “Piety and Poetry: Isabella Whitney, Anne Dowriche, Elizabeth Colville, Rachel Speght.” In Redeeming Eve: Women Writers of the English Renaissance, pp. 87-117. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1987.

In the following excerpt, Beilin focuses on the allegorical dream in Speght's Mortalities Memorandum, which, she argues, is radical in its assumption that women have the right to acquire knowledge and the ability to teach all humanity.

… Rachel Speght's self-consciousness as a literary woman manifests itself both in the subject of her first work, A Mouzell for Melastomus (1617), a defense of women written in direct response to Joseph Swetnam's Araignment of Lewde, idle, froward, and unconstant Women and in the persona of her second, a poem, Mortalities Memorandum, with a Dreame Prefixed (1621). In the dream portion of this second work, Speght presents an allegorized version of the struggles of an avowedly pious woman to gain access...

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This section contains 2,027 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Elaine V. Beilin
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Critical Essay by Elaine V. Beilin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.