Chaim Potok | Critical Review by Bryan Cheyette

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Chaim Potok.
This section contains 664 words
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SOURCE: "The Sacred East," in Times Literary Supplement, November 27, 1992, p. 26.

In the following review, Cheyette finds fault with Potok's limited knowledge of Korea and "didacticism" in I Am the Clay.

As a young Rabbi, Chaim Potok was a United States Army Chaplain during the Korean War. He served on the front line for sixteen months and this experience later provided the material for his first, unpublished, novel. I Am the Clay is evidently a rewriting of this embryonic early work. On one level, Potok could not have moved further from the rather sentimental depictions of New York's Hasidic Jewish community which he has made his own. And yet, the traumatic clash of conflicting cultures within an adolescent hero—which is Potok's perennial theme—is at the centre of this novel no less than his preceding work. Kim Sin Gyu, who takes up this...

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This section contains 664 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Bryan Cheyette
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Review by Bryan Cheyette from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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