Pierre: or, The Ambiguities | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Brian Higgins and Hershel Parker

This literature criticism consists of approximately 46 pages of analysis & critique of Pierre: or, The Ambiguities.
This section contains 13,576 words
(approx. 46 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Brian Higgins and Hershel Parker

Critical Essay by Brian Higgins and Hershel Parker

SOURCE: “The Flawed Grandeur of Melville's Pierre,” in New Perspectives on Melville, edited by Faith Pullin, Kent State University Press, 1978, pp. 162-96.

In the following essay, Higgins and Parker consider the various ways in which Pierre fails as a novel, at the same time proclaiming it the best psychological novel that had been written in English by the middle of the Nineteenth Century.

Pierre was not conceived as a lesser effort, a pot-boiler like Redburn, which Melville disparaged as something he wrote to buy tobacco with. Judging from his response to Hawthorne's praise of Moby-Dick in mid-November, 1851, Melville intended his next book to be as much grander than his last as the legendary Krakens are bigger than whales.1 Never a novelist or romancer within the ordinary definitions, Melville in Moby-Dick...

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This section contains 13,576 words
(approx. 46 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Brian Higgins and Hershel Parker
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