Philip Roth | Critical Essay by James Duban

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of Philip Roth.
This section contains 4,721 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Duban

SOURCE: Duban, James. “Being Jewish in the Twentieth Century: The Synchronicity of Roth and Hawthorne.” Studies in American Jewish Literature 21 (2002): 1-11.

In the following essay, Duban explores connections between Roth's story “Eli, the Fanatic” and Nathaniel Hawthorne's “The Minister's Black Veil.”

To be a Jew in the twentieth century Is to be offered a gift. If you refuse, Wishing to be invisible, you choose Death of the spirit, the stone insanity. Accepting, take full life. Full agonies: Your evening deep in labyrinthine blood Of those who resist, fail, and resist; and God 
Reduced to a hostage among hostages. The gift is torment. Not alone the still Torture, isolation; or torture of the flesh. That may come also. But the accepting wish, The whole and fertile spirit as guarantee For every human freedom, suffering...

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This section contains 4,721 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Duban
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by James Duban from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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