S. J. Perelman | Critical Review by Ted Robinson, Jr.

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of S. J. Perelman.
This section contains 462 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ted Robinson, Jr.

SOURCE: "Perelman in Tune," in The New York Times Book Review, November 9, 1952, p. 44.

In the following review of The Ill-Tempered Clavichord, Robinson mentions the usual targets of Perelman's satirical wit.

One of the more interesting mysteries of modern letters, to me, is how S. J. Perelman keeps it up. It was quite a number of years ago that he began writing humor, writing it keyed up very high every sentence of the way, and here he is, still sitting on the edge of his chair constantly writing for all he is worth and still being funny a large part of the time.

What probably happened was that he suffered the misfortune at an early age of succeeding with this generous, packed-down, economy-size style, and he has been stuck with it ever since. Most young writers try to write very intensely at the top of...

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This section contains 462 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ted Robinson, Jr.
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Critical Review by Ted Robinson, Jr. from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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