Percy Bysshe Shelley | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Laura Claridge

This literature criticism consists of approximately 28 pages of analysis & critique of Percy Bysshe Shelley.
This section contains 8,173 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laura Claridge

Critical Essay by Laura Claridge

SOURCE: “The Bifurcated Female Space of Desire: Shelley's Confrontation with Language and Silence,” in Out of Bounds: Male Writers and Gender(ed) Criticism, edited by Laura Claridge and Elizabeth Langland, University of Massachusetts Press, 1990, pp. 92-109.

In the following essay, Claridge investigates Shelley's use of a female poetic voice in Alastor, The Cenci, and Epipsychidion.

In The Rape of the Lock, Alexander Pope sets out to rape Belinda/Arabella of her threatening excess of meaning—the artifice out of which she creates herself—and to make her into a virgin, a blank page. Paradoxically, that is, accession to eighteenth-century male society will “virginalize” her, the female equivalent in this poem to the castration that Pope fears to be the potential of the art-full female. Such a dangerous creature...

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This section contains 8,173 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laura Claridge