The Wild Bunch | Critical Essay by Paul Schrader

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of The Wild Bunch.
This section contains 881 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paul Schrader

Critical Essay by Paul Schrader

"The Wild Bunch is simply," says director Sam Peckinpah, "what happens when killers go to Mexico." And in the beleaguered career of Sam Peckinpah Mexico has become increasingly the place to go. It is a land perhaps more savage, simple, or desolate, but definitely more expressive. Sam Peckinpah's Mexico is a spiritual country similar to Ernest Hemingway's Spain, John London's Alaska, and Robert Louis Stevenson's South Seas. It is a place where you go "to get yourself straightened out." (p. 19)

Peckinpah carefully manages his violence [in The Wild Bunch], bargaining between the violence the audience wants and the violence he is prepared to give. Peckinpah uses violence the way every dramatist has, to make the plot turn. Then he applies vicarious violence to the plot mechanism. We don't really care whether it's logical if so-and-so is killed; we need more...

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This section contains 881 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paul Schrader
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