Paul Auster | Critical Review by Jim Shepard

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of Paul Auster.
This section contains 1,306 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by Jim Shepard

SOURCE: “This Dog's Life,” in New York Times Book Review, June 20, 1999, p. 11.

In the following review, Shepard offers positive assessment of Timbuktu, though finds fault in lapses of self-consciousness and overstatement in the novel.

At least since Alexander Pope, literature has been drafting dogs into service as metaphysical guides: “I am his Highness' Dog at Kew; / Pray tell me Sir, whose Dog are you?” The protagonist of Paul Auster's latest novel, Timbuktu, may be a “hodgepodge of genetic strains” who's all burrs and bad smells, with a “perpetual bloodshot sadness lurking in his eyes,” but he carries on that tradition. Unable to speak (though he can passably render the anapest of his three-syllable name: “woof woof woof”). Mr. Bones opens...

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This section contains 1,306 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Jim Shepard
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