The Far Side of the World | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of The Far Side of the World.
This section contains 5,795 words
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SOURCE: “The O'Brian Touch,” in Raritan: A Quarterly Review, Vol. 16, No. 1, Summer, 1996, pp. 116–31.

In the following essay, Edwards offers a positive assessment of the Aubrey/Maturin series, stating that the novels transcend mere genre writing.

Admirers of Patrick O'Brian's historical novels sometimes think of the literate English-speaking world as divided into three parts: themselves, people who haven't yet read the books, and those—so few as to be negligible—who do know but don't like them. The second group may need to hear that there are now seventeen novels dealing with the adventures during the Napoleonic wars of Captain John Aubrey, R.N., and his shipmate and close friend Dr. Stephen Maturin, physician, naturalist, and intelligence agent.

Our sense of who we are includes memories of the reading that brought us pleasure and illumination at the right time; Keats on Chapman's Homer and King Lear is more candid...

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This section contains 5,795 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Thomas R. Edwards
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Critical Essay by Thomas R. Edwards from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.