Jacob Have I Loved | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Jacob Have I Loved.
This section contains 2,211 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by M. Sarah Smedman

In her writings and conversations about her work, Katherine Paterson repeatedly raises issues which emerge as artistic challenges for her. Among these are her commitment to the young reader's right to an absorbing story and her difficulties with plotting. Herself imbued with the Christian spirit, all Paterson's stories—whether they are set in feudal Japan or World War II Chesapeake Bay—dramatize a young protagonist's encounter with the mysteries of grace and love. Her published work reveals that many of Paterson's problems with plot may derive from the challenge of discovering and sequencing a series of episodes that will present honestly and nondidactically a theme that has no sequence in it…. A plot, as C. S. Lewis says, "is only really a net whereby to catch something else." For Paterson in her latest novel, Jacob Have I Loved, that something else is the experience of swift and sudden...

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This section contains 2,211 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by M. Sarah Smedman
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Gale
Critical Essay by M. Sarah Smedman from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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