Elaine Pagels | Critical Review by James Finn Cotter

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of Elaine Pagels.
This section contains 2,589 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by James Finn Cotter

SOURCE: "Pagels's Paradise Lost," in The Hudson Review, Vol. XLII, No. 1, Spring, 1989, pp. 165-70.

In the review below, Cotter argues that while Adam, Eve, and the Serpent is well-written and persuasive, it contains misleading and inaccurate areas.

In the epilogue of her new book [Adam, Eve, and the Serpent], Elaine Pagels tells us that, dissatisfied with contemporary Christianity, she turned to the earliest Christians for answers. She assumed that in that era, when the movement was pristine and primitive, things were simpler and purer. She found the opposite to be true: the movement was diversified, divided by controversy, and complex.

So what else is new?

Well, what Pagels found sounds strangely familiar, a not-so-distant mirror of our own time: martyrs, particularly women, ready to lose their lives rather than surrender their freedom to the will of the State; Gnostics, eager to include women in...

(read more)

This section contains 2,589 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by James Finn Cotter
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Review by James Finn Cotter from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook