Thomas Nelson Page | Critical Essay by Robert B. Downs

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Thomas Nelson Page.
This section contains 2,241 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert B. Downs

Critical Essay by Robert B. Downs

SOURCE: "Moonlight and Magnolia: Thomas Nelson Page's In Ole Virginia," in Books That Changed the South, University of North Carolina Press, 1977, pp. 176-85.

Downs argues that Page showed no artistic growth as a writer and succeeded only in creating stereotypes, but he also states that Page's work is, nonetheless, important to understanding Southern literary history.

An eminent Baltimore Sun editor, Gerald W. Johnson, a native Tar Heel, declares that "the greatest enemy of the late confederacy was certainly not Ulysses S. Grant, or even William T. Sherman. . . . Far more lasting damage was done it by men whom the South adores: at the head of the list Stephen Collins Foster. . . . Deceivers of the same kind were orators of Henry Grady's school and a long procession of literary gents, beginning with John Pendleton Kennedy and culminating in Thomas Nelson Page...

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This section contains 2,241 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert B. Downs
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