P. G. Wodehouse | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of P. G. Wodehouse.
This section contains 1,116 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert A. Hall, Jr.

SOURCE: “The Transferred Epithet,” in Linguistic Inquiry, Vol. IV, No. 1, Winter, 1973, pp. 92-4.

In the following essay, Hall analyzes Wodehouse's use of the transferred epithet, contending that it lends a comic effect to his fiction.

I balanced a thoughtful lump of sugar on the teaspoon.

(P. G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning [1946] Chapter 5)

Hold on a minute—there must be something wrong here. Lumps of sugar aren't thoughtful, are they? What the narrator must mean is something like “I thoughtfully balanced a lump of sugar on the teaspoon,” or perhaps “I was thoughtful, and I balanced a lump of sugar on the teaspoon.” Couldn't this be the result of a momentary lapse on the part of the author, or even an unintentional transposition effected by an inattentive typesetter?

No, there is nothing wrong here. Wodehouse...

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This section contains 1,116 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert A. Hall, Jr.
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Critical Essay by Robert A. Hall, Jr. from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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