Cynthia Ozick | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Cynthia Ozick.
This section contains 411 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Victor Strandberg

If we postulate that the "scene" in fiction corresponds to the image in poetry, we may say that Ozick's interplay of fictional devices consistently develops scenes answering to Ezra Pound's Imagist Manifesto of 1913: they "transmit an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time." The pagan motifs converging into the night of Tilbeck's apotheosis; the Pagan Rabbi's breathtaking consummation of love with the dryad; Puttermesser chanting her beloved golem back to a pile of mud; Tchernikhovsky insolently at ease in Zion; Lushinski in Africa contemplating his buried self in Warsaw; the many dramatic verbal battles rendered with a perfect ear for speech patterns: Edelshtein versus the evangelist, Bleilip versus the rebbe, German versus Jew in "The Suitcase"—such scenes bespeak a gift of the first order of talent. Even if not outstandingly abundant in the fashion of Joyce Carol Oates or Saul Bellow, Ozick's stream of creativity...

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This section contains 411 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Victor Strandberg
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Critical Essay by Victor Strandberg from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.