Our Mutual Friend | Critical Essay by Stanley Friedman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Our Mutual Friend.
This section contains 9,890 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Stanley Friedman

SOURCE: “The Motif of Reading in Our Mutual Friend,” in Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Vol. 28, No. 1, June, 1973, pp. 38-61.

In the following essay, Friedman explores the way the motifs of reading and literacy serves not only to reinforce the themes of Our Mutual Friend, but also to help move the plot forward and to define characters.

Two-thirds of the way through Dickens' Our Mutual Friend, Eugene Wrayburn responds to his friend's criticism:

“You charm me, Mortimer, with your reading of my weaknesses. (By-the-bye, that very word, Reading, in its critical use, always charms me. An actress's Reading of a chambermaid, a dancer's Reading of a hornpipe, a singer's Reading of a song, a marine painter's Reading of the sea, the kettle-drum's Reading of an instrumental passage, are phrases ever youthful and delightful.)”1

Eugene's casual...

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This section contains 9,890 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stanley Friedman