Othello | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Othello.
This section contains 7,407 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Margo Hendricks

SOURCE: “‘The Moor of Venice,’ or The Italian on the Renaissance English Stage,” in Shakespearean Tragedy and Gender, edited by Shirley Nelson Garner and Madelon Sprengnether, Indiana University Press, 1996, pp. 193-209.

In the following essay, Hendricks explores the importance of Venice as the play's setting, and proposes that Venice is “a crucial yet often critically neglected racial persona in Othello.

A number of critics have read Othello principally with an eye toward illuminating the moral sense of the problematic racial and sexual politics engendered not only by the play's depiction of what is viewed as an interracial marriage but also by Othello's sensationalized murder of his wife, Desdemona.1 The obstacle facing all such critical readings, as Michael Neill astutely points out, is that the play itself conspicuously denies us (even as it denies Othello) an opportunity to enact...

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This section contains 7,407 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Margo Hendricks
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Critical Essay by Margo Hendricks from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.