Othello | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 31 pages of analysis & critique of Othello.
This section contains 8,271 words
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SOURCE: “Othello's African American Progeny,” in South Atlantic Review, Vol. 57, No. 4, November, 1992, pp. 39-57.

In the essay below, Andreas compares Othello, Richard Wright's Native Son, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, and Amiri Baraka's Dutchman in order to discuss myths and cultural conceptions of race.

Derrida writes; “There’s no racism without a language.”1 I take this to mean that racism—and all the violence historically associated with it—is generated by language. Racial difference is not genetically “real,” nor is it grounded in real experience but is a product of verbal conditioning.2 Racism cannot long survive without the verbal and symbolic apparatus that generates and sustains it: the names, the jokes, the plays, the speeches, the casual exchanges, the novels. In short, racism is a cultural virus that is verbally transmitted and its antidote must therefore be verbally administered as well. Othello—along with the many African American texts...

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This section contains 8,271 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James R. Andreas
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Critical Essay by James R. Andreas from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.