Lloyd Osbourne | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Lloyd Osbourne.
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SOURCE: A review of Peril, in The Bookman, London, Vol. LXXVI, No. 451, April, 1929, p. 64.

In the following review, the critic recounts the plot of Peril and comments on the "charm and fragrance" of its love story.

There is a briskness about this latest story [Peril] by Stevenson's stepson and collaborator which quickly arrests the attention and retains it. For hero, Mr. Lloyd Osbourne presents in Hal Curwen—novelist, thirty-six, divorced—a portrait which may owe something to his own early New York experiences; but his setting and the other characters are wholly of the New York and Long Island and California of to-day. The delightful Nigma is certainly of the present. "She belonged to the new type of expensively educated young American women in whom femininity is guarded like a jewel; who can ride and swim and play games without impairing their essential charm; who can wear the...

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This section contains 254 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by The Bookman
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