The Black Book (1990 novel) | Criticism

Pamuk, Orhan
This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of The Black Book (1990 novel).
This section contains 614 words
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SOURCE: Mannes-Abbott, Guy. “Ancient and Modern.” New Statesman and Society 8, no. 360 (7 July 1995): 41.

In the following review, Mannes-Abbott applauds Pamuk's writing style and his success in representing “the texture and complexity of life in contemporary Istanbul” in The Black Book.

The Borgesian style is the literary equivalent of the Duchampian in visual art: an identifiable set of formal assumptions, which still remain curiously dissident. When The White Castle, the Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk's only other novel in English appeared in the US, it was properly compared to Borges and Calvino. The Black Book is like a 400-page extravaganza by the Argentinian master—which is almost inconceivable, and will guarantee Pamuk's international reputation.

Carcanet Press bravely translated The White Castle in 1990, before its American hurrah, and Faber published the paperback. It was preceded by two novels in the 1980s and Pamuk's fifth, The New Life, was recently published in Turkey...

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This section contains 614 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Guy Mannes-Abbott
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Critical Review by Guy Mannes-Abbott from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.