My Name Is Red | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of My Name Is Red.
This section contains 1,269 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Jonathan Levi

SOURCE: Levi, Jonathan. “The Plague.” Los Angeles Times Book Review (7 October 2001): 9.

In the following review, Levi applauds My Name Is Red as a “modern classic,” commending Pamuk's representation of “the intense life of artists negotiating the devilishly sharp edge of Islam 1,000 years after its birth.”

Istanbul, 1591: Black, a painter of miniatures, returns to his native Istanbul from his travels into Persia and the far reaches of the sultan's empire. For 12 years he has tried to escape the vision of his beautiful cousin, Shekure, whose hand was denied him by his master and uncle, Enishte Effendi. Riding into town, Black discovers that Shekure has been recently widowed and one of Enishte's illustrators has been murdered.

Love and crime in an exotic city have always proved a compelling combination to Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk, whether in his 1990 contemporary novel The White Castle or his historical The Black Book. Yet it...

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This section contains 1,269 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Jonathan Levi
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Critical Review by Jonathan Levi from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.