The Black Book (1990 novel) | Criticism

Pamuk, Orhan
This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of The Black Book (1990 novel).
This section contains 708 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Philip Glazebrook

SOURCE: Glazebrook, Philip. “Turkish but No Delight.” Spectator 275, no. 8719 (19 August 1995): 32.

In the following review, Glazebrook argues that The Black Book is ultimately an unsuccessful novel due to its weak narrative and underdeveloped characters.

In so far as this sprawl of a novel [The Black Book] is a narrative at all it tells the story of a Turkish lawyer's search for his wife. She may have left him for her older half-brother, his cousin, a journalist whose famous daily column appears to overshadow Turkish life. The search takes him among the clues and dead ends and street furniture of a labyrinthine vision of Istanbul, the city which enshrines Turkish history and Turkey's ambiguous leaning towards both East and West. The atmospheric picture of Istanbul, snowbound and benighted in most scenes, is marvelously composed so as to characterise that fascinating and repulsive city.

But the story is not gripping. It...

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This section contains 708 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Philip Glazebrook
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Critical Review by Philip Glazebrook from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.