Twelfth Night | On Not Being Deceived: Rhetoric and the Body in Twelfth Night

This literature criticism consists of approximately 53 pages of analysis & critique of Twelfth Night.
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Lorna Hutson, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London

Elder Loveless. Mistres, your wil leads my speeches from the purpose. But as a man—

Lady. A Simile servant? This room was built for honest meaners, that deliver themselves hastily and plainely, and are gone. Is this a time or place for Exordiums, and Similes, and metaphors?1

"Shakespearean comedy," writes Stephen Greenblatt, "constantly appeals to the body and to sexuality as the heart of its theatrical magic."2 Without wishing to disparage the enterprise of writing histories of the body, or indeed to underestimate what such histories have accomplished in terms of enhancing our understanding of early modern culture , I would like in the following pages to challenge the operation of a certain kind of "body history" within recent Shakespeare criticism. I do not so much want to disagree...

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This section contains 15,838 words
(approx. 53 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the On Not Being Deceived: Rhetoric and the Body in Twelfth Night