New and Selected Poems | Critical Essay by Hugh Seidman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of New and Selected Poems.
This section contains 299 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Dickey

Critical Essay by Hugh Seidman

As their titles suggest (e.g., "Mussels," "The Black Snake," "The Fawn" and so on), Mary Oliver's poems [in "Twelve Moons"] are often informed by the drama of the natural universe, and engage the themes of death and transformation in an evidently highly worked language…. Though well intentioned, the craft has slid off into inverted syntax, easy and "purple" adjectives and clumsy alliteration…. [Some of her poems also suffer] from inflated rhetoric … and a not rigorous enough use of simile and metaphor. In "Snakes in Winter," each forked tongue is "sensitive as an angel's ear" and "lies like a drugged muscle." The "angel's ear" is straight literary conceit (i.e., who says that such ears are "sensitive" or that angels even have ears); the "drugged muscle" is almost a tautology.

Miss Oliver's poems also have the predilection...

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This section contains 299 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Dickey