Sharon Olds | Critical Essay by Brian Dillon

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of Sharon Olds.
This section contains 4,778 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Brian Dillon

Critical Essay by Brian Dillon

SOURCE: "'Never Having Had You, I Cannot Let You Go': Sharon Olds's Poems of a Father-Daughter Relationship," in The Literary Review, Vol. 37, No. 1, Fall, 1993, pp. 108-18.

In the following essay, Dillon examines Olds's narrative about the relationship between her and her father running throughout Satan Says, The Dead and the Living, and The Gold Cell.

In her first three books of poetry—Satan Says (1980), The Dead and the Living (1984), The Gold Cell (1989)—as well as recently published poems not collected into book form, Sharon Olds describes a dysfunctional family misruled by a father whose abuse of power the poems' speaker responds to both as a child and an adult. Rather than one full-length Prelude-like account, Olds offers snapshots, literally dozens of short poems, a few which metaphorically delineate the father damaging the family structure, and others which...

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This section contains 4,778 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Brian Dillon
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