Of Human Bondage | Critical Essay by Dorothy Brewster and Angus Burrell

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Of Human Bondage.
This section contains 2,869 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Dorothy Brewster and Angus Burrell

SOURCE: "Time Passes," in Adventure or Experience: Four Essays on Certain Writers and Readers of Novels, Columbia University Press, 1930, pp. 39-75.

Brewster was an American educator and critic. In the following excerpt, part of a longer essay illuminating the differences between "chronicle" novels and "dramatic" novels, Brewster and Burrell classify Of Human Bondage as a dramatic novel, citing what they consider the reader's ability to sympathize with the self-pitying, imperfect Philip Carey.

Somerset Maugham's Of Human Bondage is no family chronicle, no slow birth to death progression. Its very title suggests an emotional involvement, a struggle for escape, that promises a dramatic development. Fill out the title from Spinoza's Ethics—"Of Human Bondage, or the Strength of the Emotions"—and one is prepared for a plunge into some intense form of human experience. And one takes it, too; such a...

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This section contains 2,869 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Dorothy Brewster and Angus Burrell
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Critical Essay by Dorothy Brewster and Angus Burrell from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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