Odyssey | Critical Essay by Nancy Felson-Rubin

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of Odyssey.
This section contains 8,859 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nancy Felson-Rubin

Critical Essay by Nancy Felson-Rubin

SOURCE: "Wife," in Regarding Penelope: From Character to Poetics, Princeton University Press, 1994, pp. 43-65.

In the essay below, Felson-Rubin examines the husband-wife relationship of Odysseus and Penelope and details "the formal pattern of their second courtship."

Odysseus's image of Penelope once he is home differs radically from the image that drew him there. While he journeyed, he envisioned Penelope as a fixed point, a stable goal, a telos or "fulfillment." So long as he remembered her and Ithaka, he never strayed too far nor roamed too recklessly. Once he is on Ithaka, however, Penelope becomes an enigma for him (as she is for other characters). In a sense, she is his human condition. Face-to-face, the two engage in a courtship dance in which now one, now the other takes the lead. They reverse roles, take risks, dominate, and outwit each...

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This section contains 8,859 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nancy Felson-Rubin
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