Going After Cacciato | Critical Review by Robert Wilson

Tim O'Brien
This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Going After Cacciato.
This section contains 1,020 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Robert Wilson

SOURCE: "Dreaming of War and Peace," in The Washington Post Book World, February 19, 1978, p. E4.

In the following review, Wilson favorably comments on O'Brien's realistic descriptions of war from a footsoldier's perspective in Going after Cacciato.

Fantasies must have fed the spirit of the American infantryman in Vietnam just as the canned peaches he carried in his knapsack nurtured his body. Hell means no escape; but in dreams the soldier can escape his fear and dread, and war can become, merely, a ghastly purgatory.

That is why Paul Berlin, an intelligent, sensitive foot soldier in Tim O'Brien's novel about Vietnam [Going after Cacciato], spends so much time fantasizing. On patrol, his eyes may be focused on the ground in front of him, as he looks for the enemy mine which could blow off his legs, but his thoughts are somewhere else: home, or places he...

(read more)

This section contains 1,020 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Robert Wilson
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Review by Robert Wilson from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.