'Night, Mother | Critical Essay by Richard Gilman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of 'Night, Mother.
This section contains 586 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Gilman

Critical Essay by Richard Gilman

The hyperbole machine is operating on Broadway again. Upon a modest two-character play with nothing flagrantly wrong with it—but not much to get excited about either—the reviewers have lavished nearly their whole stock of ecstatic adjectives, to which encomiums a Pulitzer Prize has just been added. Even before Marsha Norman's 'night, Mother reached New York City, Robert Brustein likened it to Long Day's Journey Into Night [see excerpt above]…. Well, O'Neill's best play and Norman's do have something in common: they both bring us unpleasant news about the family.

The play takes place one evening in a house "way out on a country road" in the South. A middle-aged woman and her thirtyish daughter live here. The mother is silly, self-indulgent and totally reliant on her daughter in practical matters; the daughter is heavyset, slow-moving...

(read more)

This section contains 586 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Gilman
Follow Us on Facebook