Hamlet | Nobler in the Mind: The Dialect in Hamlet

This literature criticism consists of approximately 28 pages of analysis & critique of Hamlet.
This section contains 8,216 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Nobler in the Mind: The Dialect in Hamlet

Geoffrey Aggeler, University of Utah, Salt Lake City

Let us imagine a Renaissance neostoic, such as Sir William Cornwallis the Younger, or Philippe de Mornay, or Joseph Hall, watching an early performance of Hamlet at the Globe sometime between 1599 and 1602. Mornay would be on an embassy from France, busy about promoting the interests of the Protestant cause and perhaps his Calvinist disposition would keep him away from the theater, but then again the memory of his good friend Sir Philip Sidney, who had a taste for Senecan tragedy, might influence him to attend. Joseph Hall, who had only recently given up the writing of Juvenalian formal verse satire and was about to enter the Anglican Church, might have had similar Calvinistic scruples. Sir William Cornwallis, whose essays are full of Shakespearean echoes, would have had no such scruples and probably did attend...

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This section contains 8,216 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Nobler in the Mind: The Dialect in Hamlet
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