Florence Nightingale | A. G. Gardiner

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Florence Nightingale.
This section contains 3,045 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laurence Housman

Critical Essay by Barbara T. Gates

SOURCE: "Not Choosing Not To Be: Victorian Literary Responses to Suicide," in Literature and Medicine, Vol. 6, edited by D. Heyward Brock, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987, pp. 77-91.

In the following excerpt, Gates examines Nightingale's struggle with thoughts of suicide prompted by her early role as an idle, upper middle-class Victorian woman,

I have written elsewhere about Victorian medical opinion on suicide and about its relationship to English law and Victorian social and intellectual history.1 Briefly, throughout the Victorian era, suicide was illegal, considered "self-murder" by the courts; until 1870 the goods and chattels of a suicide were legally forfeited to the Crown. But by the 1830s, coroner's juries had begun heavily to utilize a loophole in the law: they found more and more suicides "temporarily insane," a verdict which negated forfeiture and thus saved already aggrieved families the...

(read more)

This section contains 3,045 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laurence Housman
Follow Us on Facebook