Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o.
This section contains 4,968 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Theodore Pelton

SOURCE: Pelton, Theodore. “Ngugi wa Thiong'o and the Politics of Language.” Humanist 53, no. 2 (March-April 1993): 15-20.

In the following essay, Pelton investigates Ngugi's literary, political, and cultural significance within the context of postcolonial African literature.

I am concerned with moving the centre … from its assumed location in the West to a multiplicity of spheres in all the cultures of the world. {This} will contribute to the freeing of world cultures from the restrictive walls of nationalism, class, race, and gender. In this sense I am an unrepentant universalist. For I believe that while retaining its roots in regional and national individuality, true humanism with its universal reaching out, can flower among the peoples of the earth. …

—Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Moving the Centre: The Struggle for Cultural Freedoms

The name Ngugi wa Thiong'o may be less recognizable to American audiences than those of Nobel Prize-winning African writers Nadine Gordimer and...

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This section contains 4,968 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Theodore Pelton
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Critical Essay by Theodore Pelton from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.