Natalia Ginzburg | Critical Essay by Alan Bullock

This literature criticism consists of approximately 42 pages of analysis & critique of Natalia Ginzburg.
This section contains 12,512 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alan Bullock

SOURCE: Bullock, Alan. “Female Alienation: Childhood and First Youth.” In Natalia Ginzburg: Human Relationships in a Changing World, pp. 64-91. New York: Berg, 1991.

In the following essay, Bullock explores the impact Ginzburg's childhood had on her work.

Melancholy … is the prime characteristic of Ginzburg's fiction …1

The overwhelming sadness which led Natalia Ginzburg to compose her poem on the death of love at the age of twelve is the first known indication of her most striking characteristic: a preference for themes and situations that are elegiac if not uncompromisingly pessimistic. Once consciously identified five years later as a major stimulus for her creative writing it has rarely been abandoned, becoming something of a leit-motif, freely acknowledged by Ginzburg in her admission over forty years on that ‘As a rule I create while immersed in sadness’,2 and leading her...

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This section contains 12,512 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alan Bullock
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Alan Bullock from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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