Natalia Ginzburg | Critical Essay by Judith Woolf

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of Natalia Ginzburg.
This section contains 8,499 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Judith Woolf

Critical Essay by Judith Woolf

SOURCE: Woolf, Judith. “Silent Witness: Memory and Omission in Natalia Ginzburg's Family Sayings.Cambridge Quarterly 25, no. 3 (1996): 243-62.

In the following essay, Woolf elucidates the role of silence and omission in Family Sayings.

I have written only what I remember, so if this book is read as a chronicle it could be objected that it is full of gaps. Even though I am dealing with real life, I think it ought to be read as a novel; in other words, without asking either more or less of it than a novel can give.1

Natalia Ginzburg belonged to that remarkable generation of women writers whose talents were shaped by a late nineteenth or early twentieth-century childhood. That shaping often involved strains and repressions such as Virginia Woolf portrays in To the Lighthouse, and for Ginzburg, growing up in...

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This section contains 8,499 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Judith Woolf
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