Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself | Critical Essay by Donald B. Gibson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself.
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Critical Essay by Donald B. Gibson

SOURCE: Gibson, Donald B. “Faith, Doubt, and Apostasy: Evidence of Things Unseen in Frederick Douglass's Narrative.” In Frederick Douglass: New Literary and Historical Essays, edited by Eric J. Sundquist, pp. 84-98. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

In the following essay, Gibson discusses the appendix to Douglass's narrative as an attempt to conform to religious orthodoxy and to disguise the main text's hostility to Christianity.

Strange order of things! Oh, Nature, where art thou. Are not these blacks thy children as well as we?

J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur1

My Lord and Master, help me! My load is more than I can bear. God has hid himself from me and I am left in darkness and misery.

An Anonymous Slave Mother2

Jesus is dead and God has gone away.

The Souls of...

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This section contains 6,943 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Donald B. Gibson