Much Ado About Nothing | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Much Ado About Nothing.
This section contains 2,310 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Philip Traci

SOURCE: Traci, Philip. “‘Come, 'tis no matter. / Do not you meddle’: Too Much Ado in Shakespeare's Comedy.” Upstart Crow 4 (fall 1982): 107-12.

In the following essay, Traci discusses the motif of meddling in the affairs of others in Much Ado about Nothing, particularly with respect to the romantic relationship between Beatrice and Benedick.

However critics have viewed Much Ado About Nothing,1 whether as happy comedy2 or Shakespeare's most cynical study in the genre3, they have agreed that its title, despite its seeming throwaway quality, carries significance. Here, however, agreement ends. Dorothy Hockey sees a central pun in the Elizabethan pronunciation of “nothing” as “nothing”, which underscores, she points out, the noting and misnoting in the play.4 The pun is not without significance to such studies as those of Berry, Evans, and Lewalski, which focus in different ways on different levels of “knowing.”5 The differences among Claudio's eyes, even when...

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This section contains 2,310 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Philip Traci
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Critical Essay by Philip Traci from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.