Much Ado About Nothing | Critical Review by Michael J. Collins

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of Much Ado About Nothing.
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SOURCE: Collins, Michael J. “Sleepless in Messina: Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing.Shakespeare Bulletin 15, no. 2 (spring 1997): 38-9.

In the following review, Collins contends that in his 1993 film version of Much Ado about Nothing, Branagh downplayed the tension regarding gender roles found in Shakespeare’s play in order to present the film as a romantic comedy in the popular Hollywood style.

The availability of Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing on videotape has provided me a way of exploring some of the issues involved in staging Shakespeare's comedies. As many people have pointed out, Claudio's question to Don Pedro in 1.1, “Hath Leonato any son, my Lord,” and the Prince's reply, “No child but Hero; she's his only heir” (284-85), open up the possibility that Claudio's interest in Hero (despite his declaration...

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This section contains 2,056 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Michael J. Collins
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Review by Michael J. Collins from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.